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M.S. Historic Preservation

Overview
The Master of Science in Historic Preservation degree is a multidisciplinary two-year program geared towards protecting the world’s architectural, cultural, and historical heritage in the face of profound change. The program relies on the architectural and historic riches of New York City and beyond—using the city as a laboratory to engage other sites and histories throughout the country and the world. As the first historic preservation and heritage conservation program in the United States, founded by James Marston Fitch in 1964, it not only remains a model for preservation programs but continues to set new creative standards and directions for the field. The program insists that preservation is as much a technical, political, and historical practice as it is a creative one.

In many ways, the Historic Preservation program owes its international reputation to the community of qualified students, pioneering faculty, visiting scholars, advanced researchers, and free-thinking professionals it attracts, educates, and sustains. Individuals graduate with the necessary skills and knowledge to advance the rapidly evolving field of preservation and join the vibrant network of alumni redefining the boundaries and practice of heritage conservation around the world. The program’s focus on environmental, social, and technological questions has become increasingly global in scope as well, with faculty and students conducting field research projects on historic buildings not only in New York and New Jersey, but in countries such as Cuba, Norway, Haiti, and Italy.

The program stresses the importance of analytical thinking and effective communication in the preservation of architectural heritage. This emphasis on communication is evidenced in the program’s peer-reviewed journal Future Anterior, which is an international point of reference in preservation theory. It is also fostered in the program’s uniquely studio- and design-based curriculum, which is built on a strong foundation of history, theory, policy, and conservation science. The program is structured around a sequence of three studios that culminate in a year-long independent research thesis.

Columbia GSAPP Preservation Technology Laboratory
Jorge Otero-Pailos, Director of the MS Historic Preservation Program at Columbia GSAPP introduces the School’s newly renovated Preservation Technology Laboratory. The lab re-opened in 2019 as a resource for Historic Preservation students and faculty, enabling cutting-edge research in preservation digital technology, materials science, and aesthetics. Read more about the Preservation Technology Laboratory.
Curriculum

The Historic Preservation Program offers a curriculum of extraordinary diversity. The curriculum includes a series of core courses, providing each student with basic knowledge of the field, and then broadens, allowing each student the opportunity to develop his or her own focus.

The core curriculum is the focus of a student’s first year. The centerpiece of the curriculum is studio. Students work individually and in groups within a studio environment, meeting one-on-one with each of the studio faculty. Key to the core curriculum is a course entitled “Theory and Practice of Historic Preservation” that provides each student with a grounding in the historical ideas behind the field. Students also take Preservation Planning and Policy, an introduction to planning as a preservation tool; Building Systems and Materials, which introduces building techniques and materials, and American Architecture I, a history of architecture in the United States through the 1880s. Several of the first semester courses continue into a student’s second semester.

During the summer between the first and second year, the Historic Preservation Program strongly suggests the completion of one or more internships or work experiences as part of a student’s education and career development.

During the second year of study, students take Preservation Colloquium, a class that analyzes issues introduced in the first year and prepares students for the completion of a thesis. By the beginning of the second year, students have finalized their thesis topic. Preliminary thesis presentations will be made during the first semester, but the bulk of thesis work will occur during winter break and during the second semester. All other classes during the second year are electives that may be taken from the offerings of the Historic Preservation Program, the School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation in general, or from classes in other departments and schools at Columbia.

Students are encouraged to focus their work, particularly in the second year, and to acquire depth in at least one of the following areas: Preservation, Design, History and Theory, and Planning and Policy.

GSAPP Conversations

Historic Preservation Program Director Jorge Otero-Pailos speaks with Carlos Bayod Lucini and Adam Lowe of Factum Arte. Lowe and Bayod Lucini jointly taught an advanced preservation studio in the Fall of 2016, which involved the documentation of the medieval church of San Baudelio de Berlanga in Spain, as well as some of its paintings in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Cloisters. Based in Madrid, London and Milan, Factum Arte was founded by Lowe and has become internationally renowned for setting new standards in digital documentation and redefining the relationship between originality and authenticity.

Historic Preservation Program Director Jorge Otero-Pailos speaks with Robert Hewison, who taught the course “John Ruskin and the 19th Century” in the Spring 2017 Semester. They discuss Hewison’s life-long fascination and study of Ruskin, teaching students to draw as means of exploring truth, and the influence of Ruskin’s thinking on the field of preservation in particular through his study of Venice.

International Studios

Preservation as a Tool for Social Inclusion in Poughkeepsie, NY<br>Spring 2017
Yangon at a Turning Point: Progress, Heritage, and Community
Heritage, Education, and Urban Resilience: Building Alternative Futures in Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Fall 2017
Heritage, Tourism and Urbanization in Lalibela, Ethiopia; Fall 2016
The Gingerbread Houses of Port-au-Prince
Eero Saarinen US Embassy in Oslo
Borders, Boundaries, and Exchanges Between People and Things Advanced V Studio; Fall 2018

New York Region
Studio Reports

Current Faculty
Michael Adlerstein
Carlos Bayod Lucini
Francoise Bollack
Barbara Campagna
Carolina Castellanos
Belmont Freeman
Claudia Kavenagh
Christopher Neville
Theodore Prudon
William Raynolds
Laurajane Smith
Amanda Thomas Trienens

Spring 2020 Courses

Course Semester Title Student Work Instructor Syllabus Requirements & Sequence Location & Time Session & Points Call No.
A4080‑1 Spring 2020
HP Elective Internship
Meredith Brull
FULL SEMESTER
1.5 Points
11471
A4825‑1 Spring 2020
Sustainability and Preservation
Erica Avrami
409 AVERY HALL
TU 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11623
A6414‑1 Spring 2020
Digital Heritage Documentation
Bilge Kose
CONSERVATION LAB - 655 SCHERMERHORN
W 5 PM - 7 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11474
A6417‑1 Spring 2020
National Register of Historic Places
Andrew Dolkart
200 BUELL
TH 9 AM - 11 AM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11624
A6702‑1 Spring 2020
Investigative Techniques
Norman Weiss, Amanda Thomas Trienens
CONSERVATION LAB - 655 SCHERMERHORN
W 2 PM - 5 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11475
A6705‑1 Spring 2020
Housing Depression-Era New York
Andrew Dolkart
200 BUELL HALL
W 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14017
A6712‑1 Spring 2020
Conservation of Architectural Finishes
Mary Jablonski
200 BUELL HALL
TU 9 AM - 11 AM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14016
A6717‑1 Spring 2020
Comparative Hertitage Management
Carolina Castellanos
203 FAYERWEATHER
M + W 9 AM - 11 AM
SESSION A
3 Points
14019
A6750‑1 Spring 2020
HP Studio II
Erica Avrami, Tim Michiels, Bryony Roberts
301 FAYERWEATHER
TU + TH 2 PM - 6 PM
FULL SEMESTER
6 Points
11476
A6753‑1 Spring 2020
Thesis II
Jorge Otero-Pailos
BY APPOINTMENT
FULL SEMESTER
4 Points
11477
A6856‑1 Spring 2020
Master Class A
Laurajane Smith MINI SESSION
CONSERVATION LAB - 655 SCHERMERHORN
2/21/20- 2/28/20
SESSION A
1.5 Points
20115
A4124‑1 Spring 2020
Modern Building Technology
Theodore Prudon
CONSERVATION LAB - 655 SCHERMERHORN
TH 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11472
A4341‑1 Spring 2020
Modern American Architecture
Jorge Otero-Pailos
300 BUELL SOUTH
M 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11473
A4694‑1 Spring 2020
Reading Buildings, Writing Buildings
Mark Rakatansky
505 AVERY
W 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11621
A4890‑1 Spring 2020
Conflict Urbanism
Laura Kurgan
300 BUELL SOUTH
W 9 AM - 11 AM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11361
A4122‑1 Spring 2020
Mapping For Architecture Urbanism and Humanities
Emily Fuhrman
WARE LOUNGE
F 9 AM - 11 AM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14051
A4407‑1 Spring 2020
Methods in Spatial Research
Carsten Rodin
200 BUELL
F 9 AM - 11 AM
SESSION A
1.5 Points
14040
A4063‑1 Spring 2020
Points Unknown: Cartographic Narratives
Juan Saldarriaga, Michael Krisch
WARE LOUNGE
F 11 AM -1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14014
A4552‑1 Spring 2020
Dark Space: Architecture Representation & Black Identity
Mario Gooden
504 AVERY
TU 11 AM-1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
11359
A4896‑1 Spring 2020
Who Let Them Build That? An Interdisciplinary Investigation of Six Places in New York
Justin Davidson
409 AVERY HALL
F 11 AM - 1 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14041
A4898‑1 Spring 2020
(Re)Programming - Museums
David van der Leer
505 AVERY
F 12 PM - 2 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
14042
GR6892‑1 Spring 2020
Spatial Inequity: Subaltern Urbanism
TBD
TU 6:00  PM - 8:00 PM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
15776
PLAN4059‑1 Spring 2020
Circular Cities: A New Urban Future
Malo Hutson
114 AVERY
F 9 AM - 11 AM
FULL SEMESTER
3 Points
16341
Recent News
2019 Fitch Colloquium
Record/Replay: Data, Technology and Experimental Preservation
Panel Discussion 1
Introduction by Erica Avrami

Participants: Yves Ublemann, David Gissen, Hannah Lewi, Anaïs Aguerre
Tonia Sing Chi ‘18 MArch/MSHP
Award-Winning Graduation Portfolio
Toniasingchi
Andrea Tonc ‘16 MArch/MSHP Award-Winning Graduation Portfolio
Andrea tonc portfolio update
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