GSAPP Incubator

The GSAPP Incubator is a launch pad for new ideas and projects about architecture, culture, and the city. Drawing on Columbia GSAPP guest lecturers, discourse, and studio culture, the Incubator hosts and encourages a wide range of experiments initiated by recent Columbia GSAPP graduates. Targeted projects combine action with discussion at the levels of the university, the city, and local ways of life.

The GSAPP Incubator offers a platform for entrepreneurship and expanded modes of practice. Yet it is distinct from other incubators and co-working spaces in several ways. The Incubator includes the humanities as well as the sciences. It involves critique and discourse as well as action and technology. It generates deep thinking as well as concise elevator pitches. And it uses measures of success beyond profit and growth.

The Incubator is anchored by alumni members and projects, and it is part of a broader ecosystem of Columbia GSAPP research and production. The Incubator is directed by Assistant Professor David Benjamin (‘05 M.Arch) and located at 231 Bowery, as part of NEW INC, the world’s first museum-led incubator created by the New Museum.

For more information please contact GSAPP Incubator Manager Agustin Schang at aes2280@columbia.edu.

Membership

The GSAPP Incubator includes approximately 20 members. Groups may apply, but there is a maximum group size of four people. Membership lasts for one year, with the possibility of applying for renewal. Membership costs $200/month/desk and involves dedicated desk space, 24/7 access, use of conference rooms, event space, fabrication lab, and NEW INC’s Professional Development Program.

The application for 2018-19 membership is now closed.

Events and Programming

Programming for the Incubator involves public events, conversations, and professional workshops run by GSAPP alumni and guest speakers from around the world. In addition, Incubator members create programming for current students and peers and bring their experiments, learning, and professional networks to the academic programs. At the heart of the Incubator is the same studio culture of collaboration, creativity, critique, and discourse that permeates the degree programs at Columbia GSAPP.

Some recent programs initiatives include:

GSAPP Incubator Open Sessions:
Monthly events, open to general public, focused on broader themes connected to contemporary design, technology, community, civic practices, and entrepreneurship. Each event is moderated by a former Incubator member. The speakers and topics are chosen through members’ suggestions and conversations with GSAPP programing team.

Office Hours:
GSAPP Incubator’s community of GSAPP alumni advisors, mentors, and friends come in for dedicated office hours, giving members access to short one-on-one sessions with individualized critiques and feedback on specific challenges.

GSAPP Incubator Conversations:
These conversations are quarterly organized events to provide the GSAPP Incubator members with the opportunity to connect with one another on a peer level, share updates of their projects, and receive feedback from guests critics, past GSAPP Incubator members, faculty and alumni.

Fall and Spring Presentations:
Twice a year current members of the GSAPP Incubator present and discuss the work they have been undertaking during their year’s membership to other GSAPP affiliated guests and professionals.

2017-2018 Members

A-Frame
A-Frame

A-Frame critically investigates the social, economic, and political issues that frame the fields of architecture and development. A fourteen-member collective, A-Frame aims to establish a cooperative platform for young architects to share resources, incubate projects, and engage with alternative forms of practice. Since its beginning in 2014 in the studios of Architecture, Urban Planning & Real Estate programs at Columbia GSAPP, A-Frame has realized projects in a broad range of media: conferences, workshops, publications, websites, open source tools, and graduate seminars.

At the GSAPP incubator, A-Frame is investigating alternative means of housing in the US through academic research and venture capital pitching (see @building_equities and CoHN). A conference series called “Future of Alchemy” studies materially inventive contemporary practices to expand the agency of the GSAPP skill-set.

William Bodell ‘17 M.Arch
Elizabeth Cohn Martin '17 M.Arch MS.UP
Clara Dykstra '17 M.Arch
Rick Fudge '17 M.Arch
Styliani Ioannidou '17 M.Arch
Nishant Jacob '17 M.Arch
Julie Pedtke '17 M.Arch
Nabila Morales Perez '17 M.Arch
Valerie Lechene '17 M.Arch
Matthew Lohry '17 M.Arch
Matthew Ransom '17 MS.AAD
Violet Whitney '17 M.Arch
Da Ying '17 MArch MS.RED
Taylor Zanke '18 MArch MS.RED

dtls.Architecture
dtls.ARCHITECTURE

The work of dtls.ARCHITECTURE reflects a dedicated approach to collaboration which can be experienced through multiple scales, typologies, and programs. The firm is interested in an academic approach to the design, fabrication, and construction of installations, interiors, and buildings. All their projects are built on the belief that consensus creates the strongest projects.

The principal, Mark Bearak (M.Arch ‘08) is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Architecture at Columbia GSAPP and a licensed architect that has worked in residential and commercial for 15 years in NYC. Fellow collaborator/alumni Kate Samuels (MS.AUD ’14) has worked around the country in a variety of scales from the urban to installation projects.

www.dtlsarc.com
www.mbearak.com

KINDERPUBLIC
KINDERPUBLIC
KINDERPUBLIC, founded by Cevan Castle (M.Arch ‘12) and Annie Chen (M.Arch '12), aims to improve accessibility of public and private spaces for parents and caretakers with small children in cities. Their goal is to create a kinder public for families in New York City and beyond, improving accessibility of family amenities through a certification program, spatial interventions and design consultancy. The certification program will certify public and private spaces, including commercial, institutional and outdoor places that meet our specific design guidelines for family accessibility. Their digital platform utilizes relevant spatial data and research with a directory of certified members for users (parents) to explore the planning of family outings. With New York City as their experimental hub, they intend to provide more transparency for families navigating all the complexities of raising children in an urban area and to create more inclusive and equitable environments for all families.
CMYK | Kamilla Csegzi + Nicole Mater + Dong-Joo Kim
CMYK | Kamilla Csegzi + Nicole Mater + Dong-Joo Kim

CMYK Space, founded by Kamilla Csegzi (MS.ADD ‘15), Nicole Mater (MS.ADD '15), and Dong-Joo Kim (MS.ADD '15), is a design and research group dedicated to the cultivation of an Atlas of Impermanence – a trans-disciplinary dialogue of interconnected, global dynamics exploring a network of architectural and urban environments responding to states of performance. Their mission is to provoke collaboration across boundaries by recording and curating interactions through a variety of formats: exhibitions, installations, publications, and online platforms.

www.cmyk-space.com

Josh Draper
Josh Draper

Josh Draper (M.Arch ‘08) is an architect and designer working at the intersection of computation, fabrication, and material logics with a primary focus on advanced forming techniques. He is the founder of PrePost, an award-winning New York-based firm. He is a Lecturer at the Center for Architecture, Science and Ecology (CASE) a joint venture of Rennsaeler Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Skidmore Owings and Merrill (SOM). At CASE, Josh is both a professor and a researcher, leading grants concerning agricultural waste for building materials, data analytics, and green wall technologies. He recently won the 2017 City of Dreams Pavilion competition, with schlaich bergermann partner and other interdisciplinary collaborators, for the proposal Cast & Place.

www.studioprepost.com

Ines Esnal / Studio Esnal
Ines Esnal / Studio Esnal

Inés Esnal (MSADD ‘08) founded Studio Esnal in New York in 2014, expanding on her ongoing work as an artist. Through her temporary and permanent installations and her dedication to building, her practice truly crosses the boundaries of art and architecture to produce creative and inspiring spaces. The studio is currently working on a series of ground up mix-used developments in New York City, various interior architecture projects, as well as multiple art installations around the world. In both the art-focused and the architecture-focused sides of the practice, Studio Esnal combines scientific strategies and artistic approximations in the creative process in order to achieve a final product which is at once geometric and atmospheric, logical, and experiential.

www.studioesnal.com
www.inesesnal.com

Habitat Workshop
Habitat Workshop

Habitat Workshop is a New York-based architecture and urban design practice promoting design as a framework for positive changes in our communities. Founded by Jieun Yang (M.Arch ’08), the studio creates spaces and objects that activate human connections and reveal intrinsic value of a place. By combining research and practice to continuously refine and expand ways of knowing, asking, learning, and making, the studio’s work explores potential in the ordinary and the unseen.

The studio’s current work, “Agency for (im)Possible Spaces”, catalogs abandoned and underutilized resources in New York City. With topics ranging from unrentable spaces to undevelopable lots, the project investigates motivations and methodology for their potential and provides speculative strategies that maximize resources for the specific needs of the community. In parallel, the studio continues the development of “Mediated Spaces (working title)”, a book on Russia’s post-industrial cities through the lens of adaptive social, economic, political, and cultural spaces.

www.habitatwksp.com

Naomi Hersson-Ringskog
Naomi Hersson-Ringskog

Naomi Hersson-Ringskog (MS UP ‘09) develops arts-based strategies for community building, neighborhood revitalization, and creative placemaking. Since co-founding No Longer Empty, Naomi has shifted her focus on Newburgh, NY where she is developing initiatives focused on distressed properties while producing smaller cultural interventions to build the social infrastructure and tourism. She’s involved with APA, GSAPP, and Coro New York; a fellow at Urban Design Forum; a board member at No Longer Empty and The Fullerton Center; and advisor to Institute for Public Architecture.

www.dosmallinterventions.com

Interval Projects / Interval Office
Interval Projects / Interval Office

Interval Projects, founded by Marlisa Wise (M.Arch ‘11) and Benedict Clouette (M.Arch '11), is a non-profit design advocacy collaborative based in New York City. Current and recent projects include an arts space in Queens, an adaptive reuse plan for a rail line in Long Island City, a community garden and gathering space in the Bronx, and a public park on a Superfund site in Butte, Montana. Their first book, Forms of Aid: Architectures of Humanitarian Space, was published in late 2017 by Birkhauser. Their projects have received awards from the Graham Foundation, the Architectural League of New York, and Deutsche Bank Americas Foundation, among others. In 2016, the founders formed a separate but aligned for-profit design practice, Interval Office, whose recent work includes a community health clinic, a gallery, and several private residences.

www.interval-projects.org
www.interval-office.com

Mustafa Khan
Mustafa Khan
Mustafa Khan’s work looks at socioeconomic, cultural and racial tension in our current climate through the process of fictional writing and rational architectural design. It involves the collection of facts and data related to these events. His work also uses the virtual space of the Internet, the most accessible platform that propagates the extremes of these tensions and phobias, as a space for study, community engagement, and understanding. The end products are short stories that act as propaganda, questioning these tensions produced through the easy dissemination of “information” by the media, people, and other entities. Khan’s project opens a dialogue between the oppressed and the oppressors. The shape of the dialogue: violent, civil, rational, irrational, might be inconsequential, the key is to start one. The project aims the oppressors to create a form of understanding through education and provocation.
Marcelo Lopez Dinardi
Marcelo Lopez Dinardi

Marcelo López-Dinardi (MS.CCCP ‘13) is an architect and educator based in New York interested in themes around architecture and political economy, as well as the intersection of art and architecture. His writings have been published in The Avery Review, The Architect’s Newspaper, and GSAPP Books among others. As Partner of A(n) Office, a design and curatorial practice, he has exhibited at the US Pavilion in the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale and MoCAD in Detroit. He has taught at Barnard + Columbia, NJIT, Penn Design, RISD, and Pratt. He is currently working on a research project about the spatial impact of Puerto Rico’s fiscal debt.

Spatializing Debt: A Visual Audit Spatializing Debt: A Visual Audit examines the intersection of architecture, political economy and city making with the logics of state-financial debt under Puerto Rico’s current status (originated pre-Hurricane Maria), by giving territorial and spatial dimension to the so-called public debt.

www.marcelolopezdinardi.com

Alejandra Navarrete Llopis
Alejandra Navarrete Llopis

Alejandra Navarrete Llopis (MS.ADD ‘11) is a New York based architect and principal of Nami Studio, an architecture design and curatorial office working on public and private projects in Europe and in the US. Her work has been granted by NYSCA, the Graham Foundation, and by other European institutions.

She was Chief Curator of the Oslo Architecture Triennale 2016 together with the After Belonging Agency. Navarrete has taught studios and seminars at Columbia University GSAPP, Pratt Institute, New Jersey Institute of Technology and Virginia University School of Architecture. Her ongoing research focuses on the spatial implications of the mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in the contemporary city.

www.namistudio.com

NILE
NILE

NILE is an architecture studio founded by Nile Greenberg (M.Arch ‘16) with the belief that modernism is a starting point for design. It’s a good thing that those antiquated lessons about structure, utility and beauty are still pretty useful. Since we’ve all agreed to live together and we might as well live in utopias, oases and other beautiful and clear constructions.

www.nile.studio

SS Columbia Project
SS Columbia Project

The SS Columbia Project is restoring the 1902-built steamboat Columbia—the last of her kind—to revive the great tradition of day excursions on the Hudson River. Once in service, the SS Columbia will be a moving cultural venue for arts and education, reconnecting New York City to Hudson Valley’s cities and towns. The SS Columbia, the oldest remaining excursion steamship in the United States, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1979 and designated as a historic landmark in 1992.

www.sscolumbia.org

Superform
Superform

Superform is a new type of consultancy, operating at the intersection of design, technology, and marketing. The office has applied innovation with clients in various industries, including architecture, and real estate to build smarter, more resilient organizations. In 2013, two of its members, Adrian von der Osten and George Valdes co-founded Built-In, the largest meetup in NYC devoted to fostering entrepreneurship within the A/E/C industry. The Built-In by Superform initiative intends to bring data-driven strategies to architecture and design practices, working collaboratively to accelerate growth, productivity, and success.

www.built-in.co
www.superform.co

theLab-lab for architecture
theLab-lab for architecture

Founded by Mustafa Faruki (M.Arch ‘10) in 2010, theLab-lab is a New York-based practice that wants to completely reinvent the potential outputs of architectural design. To this end, the office produces work that positions architecture as the conveyor of imagination, the garden of proposition, and the battleground of proof. Design projects by theLab-lab have appeared in or received support from the Drawing Center, the Queens Museum, Log, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and the Norwegian Ministry of Culture. The firm was awarded the Architectural League’s Prize for Young Architects in 2017.

At GSAPP Incubator, theLab-lab is further developing existing projects for upcoming exhibitions and publications, creating the first-ever online archive documenting the work of Asian American artists, and reflecting on new strategies to save the architectural profession from itself.

Mustafa is a Lecturer in the Asian American Studies Program at CUNY Hunter College and was named the 2018-19 Reyner Banham Fellow at the State University of New York at Buffalo.

www.thelab-lab.com

Julia Molloy Gallagher
Julia Molloy Gallagher

Julia Molloy Gallagher (M.Arch ‘07) is a designer, architect, and educator. While at the GSAPP incubator she produces multidisciplinary projects including architecture, interior design, participatory workshops, and art installations. Inspired by nature, the city, and white noise - she specializes in curating engagement between cities, organizations, designers, and individuals to improve people’s experience in the places they visit, live, and love. Her studio focuses on cultural, sustainable, and transformative environments that interface between historic spaces and the transient communities who create them.

With her speculative projects she asks questions like “Who owns the city?”, “How can architects be agents of change?”, and “What actually is sustainable development?” The images shown, are excerpts from J Training: a documentary research looking at the development of commercial real estate on church properties near the J Train in Bushwick, Brooklyn.

www.juliamolloygallagher.com

Recent Incubator Activity on Are.na

View the most up-to-date research, events and work at the GSAPP Incubator on Are.na

   
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