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Fill in the Gaps: Modules on Top

Located near Tompkins Square Park, the P.S. 64 school is situated in a desirable spot. The school itself, however, is surrounded by relatively high-income residents. As a consequence, kids from low- and middle-income families suffer from greater inaccessibility. To counterbalance this, the project provides stackable modules—light-weight wooden dormitories and a wood framed greenhouse—on the rooftop of the existing H building. The gaps between the legs of the existing H are filled in with new platforms that function as green labs, student kitchens, and a glass covered indoor green space that houses a circulation loop. Most of the existing structure remains, but the exterior bricks are painted white for consistency with newly added structures. With new rooftop facilities—dormitories, a greenhouse, and an urban farm—and the new programs inside such as indoor green space and student kitchens, this project hopes to provide kids from low- and middle-income families with a better hands-on green experience.