Stacie Wong: Building in the City

Fri, Jun 1    12pm

Stacie Wong, principal at GLUCK+, will kick off the Columbia MSRED 2018-2019 Lunchbox Lecture series with a talk entitled “Building in the City.”

Named by Fast Company as one of the top 10 most innovative companies in architecture in 2014, GLUCK+ is recognized for Architect Led Design Build: single-source responsibility with architects leading the building process. The practice is dedicated to pushing the boundaries of design with real-world expertise to craft bold and conceptually unique architecture. The firm was featured in Architectural Record “The New Master Builders,” The Architect’s Newspaper “Inside Architecture’s One-Stop Shop,” and Architect “Best Practices: Engaging in Architect Led Design Build.” Projects were recently featured in AD Architectural Design, Wallpaper* and Interni magazines.

Since the firm’s beginnings, GLUCK+ has been involved in real estate development from prefabricated housing in Vermont to turnkey affordable housing in Aspen, Colorado to multifamily mixed-use developments in New York City and Philadelphia. GLUCK+ was part of the developer team for The Stack, the first prefabricated steel and concrete modular residential development in New York City which received a 2015 AIANY/BSA Housing award, and Bridge, the first LEED Gold high-rise development in Philadelphia. Currently, GLUCK+ is a development partner for 150 Rivington, a luxury condominium development in the Lower East Side.

GLUCK+ works throughout the United States. Notable award-winning projects executed through the Architect led Design Build process include Cary Leeds Center for Tennis & Learning, a public/private partnership project for NYC Department of Parks and Recreation and New York Junior Tennis & Learning; Pilkey Laboratory, a LEED Gold research facility for Duke University; and The East Harlem School.

Stacie Wong holds a BA in Architecture from University of California at Berkeley and an MArch from Yale University.

Organized by the MSRED program as part of the Lunchbox Lecture series.

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