Transformations from the Bottom Up

Mon, Jun 24    12:30pm

Transformations from the Bottom Up

Urban spaces are dynamically shaped by multiple actors from the top down, bottom up, inside out, and outside in. What are the approaches of those who work on change from the ground up? Who benefits and who gains from these efforts? A panel of experts and activists representing Long Island City, Sunset Park, and Jersey City/ Hoboken – the study sites for the UD Summer 2019 studio – will reflect on their advocacy and practices to re-shape their neighborhoods, sometimes with surprising results.

James Solomon, Ward E Councilman, Jersey City, New Jersey
Donovan Finn, Assistant Professor, Sustainability Studies Program, Stony Brook University
moderated by Jae Shin, Partner, Hector Design Service

Ward E Councilman James Solomon believes in just and efficient government. Serving as an aide to the Mayor of Boston, he utilized technology to solve persistent problems like potholes and snow removal. James also designed an affordable housing policy for the state of Massachusetts and the foundation for a performance management system for Newark, NJ. James earned his Master in Public Policy from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and his BA from Pomona College. He is currently an adjunct professor at three Jersey City universities: St. Peters University, New Jersey City University & Hudson County Community College.

An urban planner, Donovan Finn’s research focuses on sustainability and resiliency planning in the New York region, the utility of public participation for effective planning, and understanding how communities effectively recover from a disaster. He has consulted with local governments in Illinois and Missouri on growth management and sustainable development and works regularly with non-profit organizations and local governments in New York City and Long Island on issues of sustainability, resilience, and public participation.

Jae Shin is a designer and partner at HECTOR. She recently served as an Enterprise Rose Architectural Fellow at the New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA), where she facilitated efforts to define and implement design principles for preserving and rehabilitating New York City’s public housing. She holds degrees in painting from Rhode Island School of Design and architecture from Princeton University. Her projects have received support from the MacDowell Colony and the National Endowment for the Arts, and she has led design studios at New Jersey Institute of Technology and the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Free and open to the public.
Organized by the Urban Design program.

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