Bry Sarté

Bry Sarté is an author, professional engineer, academic and nonprofit founder. Fourteen years ago, he started Sherwood Design Engineers, which now has several offices in the United States and has worked on hundreds of leading national and international engineering projects. His work significantly influences contemporary global urban transformation around issues of infrastructure, urban design and ecological systems. He regularly serves as a lecturer at top universities and conferences around the world, where he discusses applications of ecological engineering to planning, design, and construction. He is faculty in Columbia GSAPP’s Urban Design Program, where he teaches the graduate course Infrastructure, Resiliency, and Public Space.

As engineer for hundreds of the world’s leading sustainable engineering projects, Mr. Sarté’s work responds to global environmental issues addressing the intersection of infrastructure, ecological and urban design. Many of his projects have been the first-of-their kind in applying green infrastructure systems, strategies and concepts. From innovative planning projects on one end of the spectrum to implemented construction projects on the other, much of Sarté’s work has been highly integrated, highly collaborative design developed in tandem with the world’s leading architecture and landscape architecture firms.

Sarté has served as the principal in charge for projects that range from the largest private real estate development in the U.S., Hudson Yards in New York, to the award-winning San Francisco Better Streets Plan. Other notable projects include the revitalization of the iconic waterfront Brooklyn Bridge Park, the award winning Greater New Orleans Urban Water Plan, and the 35 sq-km award-winning Baietan Urban Area Plan in the heart of Guangzhou, China. Additionally, he has led the engineering design for numerous completed construction projects that have changed the direction of how we build. The projects range from institutional buildings to civic infrastructure.

Sarté is the author of Sustainable Infrastructure: The Guide to Green Engineering and Design (John Wiley & Sons, 2010), which serves as a comprehensive guide to integrating sustainable strategies into infrastructure planning and design with emphasis on water resource management, site design and land planning. Throughout the book Sarté highlights the central role that creative engineering integrated into collaborative design processes play in developing the complex solutions needed to affect a sustainable transformation of our built environment. He is currently working with Columbia GSAPP Publications on his second book Innovations in Urban Water Infrastructure. This book identifies recommendations for innovative approaches to dealing with water in an urban environment with at critical focus on the United Nations Habitat III.

As chair of the Sustainable Landscape and Engineering Committee at SPUR, (San Francisco Planning and Urban Research) Sarté works with participants from the Department of Public Works, SFPUC, Department of Parking and Traffic, Urban Forestry Council, Department of the Environment, Planning Department, Alliance for a Clean Waterfront, PG&E, Friends of the Urban Forrest, and other non-profit, designers and community groups. The outcome of their workshops and strategy sessions has helped to define priorities to integrate the stormwater management system, increase tree planting and landscaping, improve the pedestrian environment, improve San Francisco’s natural ecosystems, and increase public awareness of green living through eco-revelatory design.

Bry founded the Sherwood Institute in 2009. The institute is comprised of academic, professional, and government advisors from five countries directing research and innovation at the nexus of critical water and energy issues. The nonprofit’s mission is to safeguard and extend the availability and energy efficiency of the threatened vital fresh water resources in the six developed continents. He currently serves as the founder of this nonprofit.

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