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Architecture Bio-Synthesis Project Participates in Workshop for Landscape Futures Symposium

NEW YORK, JANUARY 2011

A research team from the Architecture Bio-Synthesis Project at Columbia participated in a workshop leading up to the Landscape Futures symposium on January 15, 2011 at the Center for Land Use Interpretation in Culver City, California.

The team was composed of GSAPP critic David Benjamin, and students Sarah Carpenter, Rikki Frenkel, Zhong Ren Huang, Kooho Jung, Nathan Smith, and Jayson Walker. Investigations were made regarding the intersection of transportation fuel, synthetic biology, landscape, and architecture. Research and design projects simultaneously explored a vast range of scales simultaneously, from micro to macro, from cells to global climate, from DNA with a radius of about one billionth of a meter, to the Earth with a circumference of 40 million meters. The central question guiding the projects was: If the twentieth century involved boring into the earth for petroleum fuel via technologies of physics, might the twenty-first century involve cultivating the earth for biofuel via technologies of biology?

This research was part of a broader collaborative super-workshop called Landscape Futures, organized by Geoff Manaugh of BLDGBLOG, with other participants including Mark Smout, Laura Allen, the Bartlett School of ArchitectureDavid Gissen, the Arid Lands Institute, the Center for Land Use Interpretation, and the Nevada Museum of Art. The super-workshop and a parallel exhibition at the Nevada Museum of Art are examining how landscapes, and our perceptions of them, can be radically transformed by architecture, technology, and design.