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Plagiarism and Acknowledgment of Sources

Students will be asked to do a great deal of written work while at Columbia: term papers and analytic essays of different lengths. These papers play a major role in course performance.
There have been some instances in which students attempt to submit the work of other people as their own. Because intellectual integrity is the hallmark of educational institutions, academic dishonesty is one of the most serious offenses that a student can commit at Columbia GSAPP. A failing grade in the course is a minimal penalty.

In making clear Columbia’s policy on plagiarism, it is not feasible to include here all the various forms-they are innumerable-that plagiarism might take. It is useful, however, to list several varieties in order to dispel confusion about actions that the School will not accept:

Submitting essays, or portions of essays, written by other people as one’s own;

Failing to acknowledge, through footnotes and bibliographic entries, the source of ideas essentially not one’s own;

Failing to indicate paraphrases or ideas or verbatim expressions not one’s own through proper use of quotations and footnotes;

Collaborating on an assignment or examination without specific permission from the faculty member to do so.

If questions arise concerning proper use of quotations, footnotes, or bibliographies, the student should contact the instructor. In addition, students may not submit an essay written for one course to a second course without having received prior permission from both instructors. Seeking informed advice from a faculty member is the best way to avoid confusion about matters that can be complicated.