Loading...

Architecture Inside/Out

organized by the Ph.D students in Architecture at the GSAPP, supported by the GSAPP, the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts

Architectural discourse is problematized by notions of insides and outsides: Its productions, institutions, disciplinary boundaries, geographical alignments, and social milieu all raise questions of interiority and exteriority. How do we frame our research so as to delimit, dissolve, and reconstitute these edges?

  • - What sort of artifacts or practices should be included within the bounds of architectural design and history?
  • - How do other disciplines inform the study, practice, and theorizing of architecture, and vice-versa?
  • - What role do metropolitan centers and their institutions play in forming architectural communities and topics of study? How do geographically and culturally dispersed institutions interact, if at all, and define their respective roles?
  • - Whom does architecture serve and what are the relations between architect, client, state, and public? How does this matrix operate in different national contexts?
  • - What are the tensions between the academy and the profession, or between the various niches of criticism, history, and studio education within the academy?
  • - What socio-economic groups are enlisted within the ranks of the profession, and how do institutional structures influence its demographic make-up?
 

In order to open up the discussion to a community beyond our institutional department and disciplinary boundaries, we are proposing that this very act of "opening up" (or, flipping "inside-out") should constitute both the topic and the structure of our proposed program. That is, in order to interrogate issues of interiority and exteriority, we resist the prescribed outlines of an academic conference, and want rather to extend this discussion by eliciting a diverse range of speakers and employing a broad array of media and conversational venues: we propose to invite participants of international scope both outside and inside university departments of architecture to participate in a public series of workshop discussions; organize graduate symposia to give students from various institutions and programs an opportunity to present their research; finally, to extend the conversation (both demographically and temporally), we will launch a website with audio-recordings from the events, as an online discussion forum to provide an ongoing site for intellectual exchange.

Workshop #07

April 19, 2011

ADOLF LOOS, CRIME, AND THE CULTURE OF THE 'CASE'

with Frederic Schwartz
Coordinated by Hollyamber Kennedy and Ginger Nolan

Workshop #06

February 23, 2010

IS ARCHITECTURE ACCOUNTABLE: THE EPISTEMOLOGICAL OFFERINGS OF SCIENCE STUDIES

with Albena Yaneva
coordinated by Alexandra Quantril

Workshop #05

October 6, 2009

PARTICIPATION

with Irit Rogof
coordinated by Ayala Levin

Workshop #04

April 9, 2009

OF VEILS AND MOURNING: FAZAL SHEIKH'S WIDOWED IMAGES

with Eduardo Cadava
coordinated by Daniel Talesnik

Workshop #03

November 18, 2008

AVANT-GARDE ORGANICISM: UNRAVELING THE RHETORIC OF EMERGENT GENETIC ARCHITECTURE

with Christina Cogdell
coordinated by Irene Cheng

Workshop #02

October 8, 2008

BETWEEN CATASTROPHE AND SHANGRI-LA: SUSTAINABLE ARCHITECTURE

with Volker M. Welter
coordinated by Daniel Barber

Workshop #01

April 14, 2008

POPULAR MIES

with Juan José Lahuerta
coordinated by Maria Gonzalez Pendas and Marta Caldeira

Symposium #01

March 27, 2009, 2:00pm-7:30pm
March 28, 2009, 10:30am-6:00pm

AMBIGUOUS TERRITORIES: ARTICULATING NEW GEOGRAPHIES IN LATIN AMERICAN MODERN ARCHITECTURE AND URBANISM

coordinated by Patricio del Real and Helen Gyger

Symposium #02

April 2, 2010
April 3, 2010
Wood Auditorium, Avery Hall

ARCHITECTURE AND THE STATE, 1940s to 1970s

The worldwide formation and reconfiguration of states in the 1940s presented architectural culture with new ideological scenarios and an increased opportunity for building and planning. From reconstruction of old states to the construction of new ones, from definitions of the limits of the sovereignty of the state to the development of international relationships and transnational organizations, models varied from the Welfare State and Social Democracy Planning to dictatorial and autarchic regimes. Arguably, in the following decades the state operated, overtly or not, as a dominant framework of social, political and cultural life at a global scale. Issues pertaining to the building of the state were also confronted through architectural strategies, such as migration of populations; ethnic diversity; urban and rural territorial management; centralization and de-centralization. In all, state initiatives like planning urban expansion or new towns, the provision of public housing and services (such as health and education), buildings for new institutions, new legislative measures in planning and building, and the international projection of a state’s image through cultural objects, reconfigured the public role of the architect and called for his or her intervention.
 
The intention of the symposium is to explore the dynamics between architecture, urbanism and the state during the 1940s to1970s: How did architects assess and take a position – of collaboration, critical negotiation, or resistance – vis-à-vis the apparatus of the state? What were the instruments devised, both at conceptual and practical levels, to support these positions? How did this new socio-political frame become the ground for revising the legacy of early modern architecture? In what ways were these revisions circulated, incorporated, and translated internationally? And finally, how did the architectural or urban object embody these dynamics? We call for research that helps to construct the variegated panorama of institutional initiatives, social services, public policies and architectural responses in a broad geopolitical frame that may include the post-World War II reconfiguration of states, the new postcolonial nations, different welfare models, the soviet bloc, and the works and demise of dictatorial regimes. Ultimately, our hope is to open the territory in between the instrumentality of architecture (by the state) and the political agency of architecture for historical exploration.

Symposium #03

May 4, 2012
May 5, 2012

THE DISAPPEARING NON-WEST, ARCHITECTURES OF "GLOBALIZATION"

Coordinated by Chris Cowell, James Graham, Hollyamber Kennedy, Diana Martinez and Norihiko Tsuneishi