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2011 Historic Preservation Travel

Summer 2011 Workshop in Palestine

A group of nine GSAPP students—including Michael Frigand, Matthew Kuhnert, and Jessica Ouwerkerk (all HP ’12)—participated in a month-long preservation workshop in Israel-Palestine that was co-sponsored by the Columbia University Middle East Research Center and the Riwaq Center for Conservation, a non-governmental, non-profit organization based in Ramallah. Led by faculty Craig Konyk and Anthony M. Tung, the team surveyed, documented, and assessed the existing historic fabric of Deir Ghassaneh, a Late Ottoman “throne village” located about 25 kilometers northwest of Ramallah, in preparation for a preservation plan and future rehabilitation efforts. Their research and fieldwork formed the basis for the Fall 2012 Joint Architecture/Preservation Design Studio.

Led by staff from Riwaq, the students also had the opportunity to meet with colleagues from other heritage preservation organizations and to study examples of completed restoration and rehabilitation projects located throughout the West Bank and the Old City of Jerusalem. Within the context of broader redevelopment strategies, the students learned how these organizations are using cultural heritage resources to encourage the economic and social revitalization of communities through the rehabilitation and adaptive reuse of historic structures for new housing and community facilities, jobs creation in the traditional building trades, and cultural tourism.
Photos by Matthew Kuhnert

Summer 2011 Project in Greece

Alison LeFever, Sarah Morrison, and Tony Baragona (all HP '12) participated in a project of World Monuments Fund to create a conditions report for the katholikon (church) of a historic convent on the island of Lesvos, Greece. The objective of this effort will be to ensure the preservation of the sacred wall paintings that cover the interior of the church.

The three students worked under the guidance of Michael Devonshire, Adjunct Historic Preservation Professor, and Adrian Heritage, wall paintings conservation professor at the Cologne Institute of Conservation Sciences. After spending three weeks in Greece studying the integrity of the church building, the students are helping assemble a thorough report consisting of measured drawings, conditions photography, and a close analysis of the building and its wall paintings. In addition, together with Adjunct Professor Pamela Jerome, they examined 11 other churches and sites throughout the island. The team was led by Ioannis Avramides (HP '10) of World Monuments Fund.

The students have also blogged about their experiences: http://www.wmf.org/journal/following-water

Photos by Ioannis Avramides/WMF

Spring 2011 Workshop in Italy

During winter break, students and faculty were given the opportunity to participate in a fascinating week-long workshop in Rome, where they studied the 16th century architecture of Giulio Romano and completed an analysis of Romano's Palazzo Stati Maccarani. The trip was funded by a grant to GSAPP from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation.

The group included GSAPP Professors Mark Rakatansky, Francesco Benelli, and HP Director of Conservation Research George Wheeler, Historic Preservation students Christina Varvi and Angela Curmi, Architecture students Mike Marsh and Brian Joon Lee, and Art History students Adam Eaker and Lorenzo Vigotti.

Angela Curmi (HP 2011) shared her experience:

"Our journey began in the northern Italian city of Mantua, where we visited the Palazzo Ducale, Romano's Palazzo del Te, and San Benedetto Po, among other notable sites. Next, we travelled to Rome, where we began our work on Palazzo Stati Maccarani, analyzing the form and materials and doing archival research for a complete study of the building, and investigating for evidence of previous restorations. We stayed at the American Academy in Rome, a McKim, Mead, and White building located on the Gianicolo with spectacular views of the city. While not at work on Palazzo Stati Maccarani, we visited numerous sites throughout Rome, including Palazzo Farnese, Piazza dei Cavalieri di Malta and Santa Maria del Priorato. It was an extraordinary trip and learning experience for everyone."

Achaeological Sites in Syria

Katherine Malishewsky, Mary Nastasi, Lauren Racusin, Sarah Sher, and Kerensa Wood

Katherine Malishewsky, Mary Nastasi, Lauren Racusin, Sarah Sher, and Kerensa Wood used their Kinne Travel Grant to complete a whirlwind tour of Syria in January 2011. With the intention of studying the management of archaeological sites in Syria, they managed to visit every UNESCO World Heritage Site in the country: Palmyra, Crac des Chevaliers, and the ancient cities of Aleppo, Bosra, and Damascus. In between visiting vast, historic ruins, the students enjoyed hummus, Syrian bread, endless amounts of baklava, and practicing their Arabic on locals.

Paint Research Trip to Lincoln, England

Angela Curmi (MSHP ’11)

"In August 2010 I traveled to Lincoln, England, to attend the 4th International Architectural Paint Research Conference, which took place at the University of Lincoln. The conference brought together paint conservation experts from around the world who spoke on a wide range of subjects and projects, from new methods and technology for paint analysis, to the various uses of paint research - in restoration projects, in uncovering a building's history, and even in crime cases. The focus was on "Sharing Information" and the conference provided a great opportunity for conservators to learn and gain valuable insight from each others' work.

Famous for its grand cathedral, Lincoln provided an ideal location for the conference. After lectures ended each day, visitors were able to explore the city and its rich offering of historic buildings. During the second day, we also travelled outside of Lincoln for guided tours of historic houses and castles. I chose the tour of Brodsworth Hall, a Victorian country house which English Heritage has decided to conserve as it was when Brodsworth was still a family home, with mid-20th century objects scattered amidst 19th-century furnishings.

As a student with a particular interest in the conservation of architectural finishes, the Architectural Paint Research Conference was a great learning experience for me. The lectures and events were fascinating and enlightening, I met many interesting people from around the world, and I learned about the great possibilities of the field.As a student with a particular interest in the conservation of architectural finishes, the Architectural Paint Research Conference was a great learning experience for me. The lectures and events were fascinating and enlightening, I met many interesting people from around the world, and I learned about the great possibilities of the field."

Other 2011 Kinne Graduation Prize Winners
KATHERINE MALISHEWSKY & LORENA PEREZ
How to preserve the ruin?:  Analysis of design strategies and ambience qualities in the reuse of industrial architecture

SARAH MODIANO 
Documenting and Analyzing Preservation Approaches to Urban Art Environments in the United States

SARAH SHER
Preserving Weathered Béton in France: the Importance of "Patina" in French Restorations of Le Corbusier & Marcel Breuer's 1950s-1960s Concrete masterpieces